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The Mini Time Machine was created from the imagination and dedication of Founders, Patricia and Walter Arnell. Pat’s fondness for miniatures began in the 1930’s, when as a young girl she received her first miniatures- a set of Strombecker wooden dollhouse furniture. It wasn’t until the Arnells moved to Tucson in 1979 that Pat began collecting in earnest. The Arnell’s became very active in the miniature community becoming recognized members and supporters of important organizations such as NAME (National Association of Miniature Enthusiasts) and IGMA (International Guild of Miniature Artisans).The collection grew and the Arnells, dreamed of a way to share it with more people. They envisioned an interactive space where the entertaining and educational aspects of the collection could be enjoyed by everyone- a place that would be enchanting, magical and provide a rich sensory experience.

The concept of “the mini time machine” was born out of the notion that a visitor would be seemingly transported to different eras by the stories and history of the pieces in the collection. The design and building of the museum was a huge collaborative effort. Swaim Associates Architects in Tucson, Arizona was chosen as the architect for the project. The exhibit design was carried out by Claro Creative Studios, a team of designers, gadgeteers and entertainment enthusiasts based out of Glendale, California. Construction of the project spanned nearly two years.

The Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures is a 501(c)(3) board-only nonprofit organization, classified as a private foundation with a long term goal of achieving public charity status. All proceeds from every sale, including admission, membership and merchandise go towards funding the museum’s operations.

The museum is dedicated to all who participate in the world of miniatures through education, creation or enjoyment.







           Copper Fitness Gym - Green Valley, AZ   Copper Fitnes Gym,  "Building a Better You",  Geen Valley, AZ

                                                                  1060W Bets St., STE 150, Green Valley 85614,    (520) 777-3645         NOW OPEN 24/7.

                LOCATION:
                             
Copper Fitness is located in the beautiful Green Valley Sahuarita area just a few minutes south of Tucson.  Conveniently off of I-19 using the Duval Mine Rd. exit, just south of Sahuarita Rd.  We are located just behind the Octopus Car Wash and Burger King Restaurant.     We are available on both Google and Apple Maps.

        Silver Sneakers, Yoga, Steppers, Trainers, Zumba, Great Equipment
,  and a whole lot more.....Stop on by.


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Pima County Office of Emergency Management launches mass notification system that keeps public informed during emergency events

 

PIMA COUNTY - Pima County has launched a mass notification system designed to keep the public informed in the event of an emergency.

 Pima County’s MyAlerts.pima.gov, hosted on the Everbridge platform, pushes messages to all kinds of devices, quickly and reliably, making it the go-to tool for keeping the public informed.

 Subscribers can receive notifications about weather-related events, police situations, public health concerns or any public emergencies. MyAlerts.pima.gov also allows Pima County to send geographically specific messages, tailored to ZIP code, blocks, streets or regions charted on a map.

 

To subscribe, users create a profile at MyAlerts.pima.gov. Subscribers can enter additional information like physical addresses, to receive emergency notifications specific to the areas where they live and work.

  

About Pima County Office of Emergency Management

 

The Office of Emergency Management works to prevent the loss of life and reduce property damage resulting from man-made, technological and natural disasters. PCOEM also assists municipalities and local governments with developing plans to ensure the highest level of emergency preparedness.

 

About Everbridge

 

Following the tragic events of 9/11, Everbridge was founded with a vision of helping facilitate this approach and improving the way that people communicate and locate their people in critical situations. Our SaaS-based critical communications platform is built on a secure, scalable and reliable infrastructure with multiple layers of redundancy to enable the rapid delivery of critical communications, with near real-time verification, over numerous devices and contact paths.

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Message from the CPAC Board of Directors:

You have probably heard the recent news concerning the proposed change to the lease agreement between CPAC and Pima County. Many donors and patrons have inquired about the status of CPAC's position on this matter. Please read the attached letter. As always, thank you for your support of CPAC!

Dear Friend of CPAC,
 
Thank you for your loyal support of the Community Performance and Art Center (CPAC). You have probably heard recent news concerning the proposed change to the lease agreement between CPAC and Pima County. The CPAC board and I have been regularly corresponding and meeting with County officials regarding this topic. It has been proposed that Green Valley Recreation lease the entire property encompassing the CPAC theater, art gallery and rehearsal space in addition to classrooms owned by Pima College, and that CPAC sub lease space from Green Valley Recreation. Many donors and patrons have inquired about the status of CPAC's position on this matter. The proposed change in the structure of our lease is inconsistent with the intended purpose of the facility when the community helped to raise funds for its completion almost a decade ago, and for its operation since. Here are several bullet points that summarize our concerns:
 
1.       CPAC donors and patrons in the community would be extremely distressed if the control of the current lease agreement were to change because they have invested a great deal of time, money and emotion into the organization. 
 
2.       CPAC was built with specific funding from Pima County and members of this community to meet the overwhelming market demand for a quality public arts center.
 
3.       There is essentially no room for another managed organization in our present space as evidenced by CPAC's extremely high occupancy rate. In fact, CPAC is in need of more space and hopes to have the opportunity to expand into any unused portions of the Pima College side of the property.
 
4.       CPAC believes it is currently optimizing the property and its benefits for the tax payers of Pima County, and is contracting with fully capable auxiliary services.
 
5.       CPAC believe that two competing organizations in the same space is fraught with potential problems, including branding confusion, especially if there is a landlord/tenant situation.
 
6.       GVR's primary function is to serves its members; CPAC serves the community at large.
 
We will continue to meet with Pima County officials on this matter but we strongly encourage you to make your voice known to Pima County leadership at the contacts found below:
 
Chuck Huckelberry, County Administrator                  
130 W. Congress St, 10th Floor                                                            
Tucson, AZ 85701                                                                  
(520) 724-8661                                                                       
Chuck.Huckelberry@pima.gov  

Supervisor Steve Christy, District 4 - Mr. Christy has chosen to back out of the negotiations 
130 W. Congress St., 11th Floor  
Tucson, AZ 85701
(520) 724-8094
 Steve.Christy@pima.gov
                                             
                                     
We welcome all questions and input from the public. CPAC may be contacted at 520-399-1750 or chris@cpacfoundation.org. Your support is greatly appreciated and we look forward to continuing our service to this community for decades to come.
 
Sincerely,
 
Eloise Fredrickson
CPAC Board Chair 

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Blue Angels to perform at 2018 Open House   Rescheduled to 2019

D-M's air show has been rescheduled to March 23-24, 2019. The following link has more information: http://www.dm.af.mil/Media/Press-Releases/Article/1387775/2018-thunder-and-lightning-open-house-rescheduled-for-2019/. Luke Air Force Base will be having the U.S. Navy Blue Angels at their air show on March 17-18, 2018. For more information, click the following link: http://www.luke.af.mil/2018-Luke-Days/.

   For more information on the Blue Angels go to: www.blueangels.navy.mil



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Letter from the Maestro
Dear Friends,
It’s time to get those ice chests and lawn chairs out and get ready for another wonderful season of Music Under the Stars! This Sunday, Mother’s Day kicks off a wonderful series of spring concerts in the park. 

We look forward to seeing you this Sunday, the opening concert of our Spring 2018 series.  As you can see from the lineup below, we've got a great evening planned for you.   
 
  
 
Your constant support and attendance is very much appreciated. To help us continue to grow and thrive, I encourage each of you to invite someone you know who has never been to a Pops concert to share the experience with you and become a new "Friend".  
 
See you at the Pops! 

László


 

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                                                       CPAC - Community Performinf Arts Center in Green Valley

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                                                                                                                Gas Light Theatre Tucson                            Gas Light Music Hall Oro Valley AZ
 Gaslight Theatre(s)

🔥 Our temps have almost reached 106! 🌡️ But don't worry! Little Anthony's Diner is your Heat Shelter! Come in this summer when the thermometer reads 106 and get a FREE junior sundae on us! 🍨 ☀️
-Limit one sundae per person per day
-Thermometer must be at 106 degrees or higher to receive free sundae


The Gaslight Theatre (Oro Valley Location)

Presents


The Gaslight Theatre, Broadway & Kolb
Wearing a mask to protect his identity, The Lone Stranger fights to bring justice to the lawless frontier. Astride his white stallion, Thunder, he strikes terror into the hearts of the gunslingers of the Old West. Join him and his friend Tonka, as they come to the aid of those in need as the Gaslight Theatre Gallops into the sunset with the Lone Stranger!
January 5th through March 25th
**Tickets are $21.95 with discounts available for kids, students, seniors and military members.
Call the box office today before tickets are gone!#520-886-9428.




COMING SOON! 

To The Gaslight Music Hall


 

 




THE MUSIC OF THE BLUES BROTHERS  
7/14/2018 Purchase

MACDOUGAL ST. WEST*PETER, PAUL & MARY TRIBUTE*  
7/29/2018 Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

We're adding new shows to the Music Hall schedule daily, make sure you visit the website and Facebook often.

 

 

Please call (520) 529-1000 to purchase tickets Online go to www.gaslightmusichall.com. We look forward to seeing you soon at The Gaslight Music Hall in Oro Valley!

 

 

CALL NOW !

520-529-1000

 

 

Don't forget to sign up for the Gaslight Music Hall email list for exclusive discounts and special offers you won't find anywhere else.

Sign up for Below For Concert updates, Coupons and more!

 

Click Here to Sign Up!

For Email Newsletters you can trust.




The Arizona Grand Opry is BACK!
Come join us to see these rising stars LIVE

The ARIZONA GRAND OPRY is a new live music production organization dedicated to developing new talent by paying homage to the roots of American Country music. Drawing on the repertoire of the legendary artists that set the American experience to song, the Arizona Grand Opry is a membership-driven showcase for those who have chosen to pursue the performing arts of country music in all its forms and styles.

The opportunity to showcase local and regional country music talent in a professional setting has been greatly lacking in the southwest. The Arizona Grand Opry sets out to fill the void by providing a forum for talented performers who share a passion for country music to develop and refine their skills (regardless of prior experience). The Opry will provide an environment that promotes education and experience-building by partnering developing talent with seasoned professional musicians, and allowing them to polish their skills in a live performance setting.

The final product of the ARIZONA GRAND OPRY and its family of performers will be a bi-monthly live concert at the beautifully-appointed GASLIGHT MUSIC HALL in Oro Valley, AZ. The production will be a public, ticketed event designed to showcase the passion and hard work of these talented up-and-comers as they perform country music classics backed by a live band comprised of music industry veterans. We encourage all music-lovers to come and be a part of this amazing process; whether onstage or in the audience, it's an amazing opportunity to watch the superstars of tomorrow as they begin their journey today!

*Tickets are only $12.50!

The ARIZONA GRAND OPRY is a new live music production organization dedicated to developing new talent by paying homage to the roots of American Country music. Drawing on the repertoire of the legendary artists that set the American experience to song, the Arizona Grand Opry is a membership-driven showcase for those who have chosen to pursue the performing arts of country music in all its forms and styles.

The opportunity to showcase local and regional country music talent in a professional setting has been greatly lacking in the southwest. The Arizona Grand Opry sets out to fill the void by providing a forum for talented performers who share a passion for country music to develop and refine their skills (regardless of prior experience). The Opry will provide an environment that promotes education and experience-building by partnering developing talent with seasoned professional musicians, and allowing them to polish their skills in a live performance setting.

The final product of the ARIZONA GRAND OPRY and its family of performers will be a bi-monthly live concert at the beautifully-appointed GASLIGHT MUSIC HALL in Oro Valley, AZ. The production will be a public, ticketed event designed to showcase the passion and hard work of these talented up-and-comers as they perform country music classics backed by a live band comprised of music industry veterans. We encourage all music-lovers to come and be a part of this amazing process; whether onstage or in the audience, it's an amazing opportunity to watch the superstars of tomorrow as they begin their journey today!

*Tickets are only $12.50!

We are looking for new Opry Talent! Email us for your chance to showcase your talent in front of your friends and family on The Gaslight Music Hall stage with a live band! vggonzo@aol.com

Fathers of Soul pays tribute to three Soul Masters of the 1960’s… Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding and Sam Cooke! These three Soul Voices helped unite the races with their music, and during the civil rights movement in a divided America, helped bring us all closer together Fathers Of Soul preserves and performs this great music with: Billy Rock and Bad News (Arizona Blues Hall Of Fame) “Settin’ the groove - Giving new life to Soul Hits of Yesteryear!”
 
With Songs like: Midnight Hour, Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay, Wonderful World, You Send Me, Shake, and one of the most played tunes of all time...Mustang Sally, they take you on a journey back in time to the Era of 60’s Soul Music! Now kick-off your shoes & socks and come dancin’ in the streets,...cause they be -- - Barefootin’ - All Night Long!!!
 
 
Check out these events at the Gaslight Music Hall!
Call right away to reserve your favorite seats!




We're adding new shows to the Music Hall schedule daily, make sure you visit the website and Facebook often.

  Please call (520) 529-1000 to purchase tickets Online go to www.gaslightmusichall.com. We look forward to seeing you soon at The Gaslight Music Hall in Oro Valley!



 
Coming up the Gaslight Music Hall in Oro Valley!



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              Biosphere 2 Tucson AZ


New Tours

The Biosphere 2 tour experience has been redesigned to feature the cutting-edge science shaping the future of our planet. Come experience the remarkable Biosphere 2, which Time Life Books named one of the "50 Must-See Wonders of the World." Updated tours include our classic Under the Glass Tour, which takes you along a once-in-a-lifetime tour route of the 3+ acre research facility, where you will smell our ocean and feel a tropical rainforest up close.

General Information

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Please arrive no later than 3:45 p.m.

Biosphere 2 is located north of Tucson, Arizona at the base of the stunning Santa Catalina Mountains. This one-of-a-kind facility sits on a ridge at a cool elevation of nearly 4,000 feet and is surrounded by a magnificent natural desert preserve. See why visitors from around the globe journey here for this unique adventure not found anywhere else. Discover real-time research on the future of our planet as it unfolds in the world's largest earth science laboratory. LEARN MORE ABOUT BIOSPHERE 2.

Please note that pets are not allowed inside Biosphere 2 or on the grounds. Service pets that are trained to do specific tasks are welcome. Do not leave pets unattended in vehicles.

Tour Schedule & Hours

Biosphere 2 is open every day of the year except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Under the Glass guided tours of Biosphere 2 are offered throughout the day on a first-come, first-serve basis. Biosphere 2 hours: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., please arrive no later than 3:45 p.m. for the last tour of the day. 

Under the Glass tours include a short film on Biosphere 2, a guided visit to the Tropical Rainforest, Savanna, Ocean, Marsh, Desert, technosphere and Lung.  As the conclusion of the tour, visitor may explore the habitat and Ocean Gallery on their own. In the habitat visitor will see the Lunar Green House, upper Landscape Evolution Observatory, Former Biospherian Dining table, kitchen and living quarters. Exploring the Ocean Gallery is a must, where you can peer into million-gallon tank ocean tank.

See the TOURS page for information on our public tour offerings.





New Sheriff’s Department Facebook Page for Green Valley Residents
January 20, 2016
As more and more Pima County residents turn to social media for their daily news and other community information, the Pima County Sheriff’s Department has decided to create a new Facebook page dedicated specifically to the Green Valley District. This new page is named “Pima Sheriff Green Valley District.”
The Pima Sheriff Green Valley page will help enhance communication between Green Valley residents and the Sheriff’s Department, giving residents the ability to communicate directly with department members. The page will be run by the Green Valley District Commander, Lieutenant Jeffrey Palmer, Green Valley District Detectives,  and other staff assigned to the area who are familiar with the nuances of day-to-day life in Green Valley. The page will feature community specific events, information on crime activity in the area, crime prevention tips, and anything else that might be beneficial to the Green Valley community.
We invite Green Valley residents to like the new Facebook page so they may have a more direct line of communication with the people who serve the community.

Here is a link to the page: www.facebook.com/PimaSheriffGreenValleyDistrict/

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                               AZ Theatre Company

                                                                                           


ARIZONA THEATRE COMPANY’S 2018/2019 SEASON REFLECTS INFLUENCE, IMPACT OF FIRST DAVID IVERS-SHAPED LINEUP

Season’s Theme, “Scene in America,” Resonates in Each of the 6 Plays

 

             Arizona Theatre Company (David Ivers, Artistic Director; Billy Russo, Managing Director) is excited to announce the six shows selected for the 2018/2019 season, ATC’s 52nd, and the first full season reverberating with the impact and influence of Artistic Director David Ivers.

             “The new season offers a kaleidoscope of reflections and explorations of the American experience, themes of literal and metaphorical family, and views of the world we live in,” Ivers said.  “I’m ecstatic about the six plays and the artists attached to them in a season which keeps the family at the epicenter through each show that reflects our theme for the year, Scene in America.”

             The 2018/2019 season offers the American premiere of Andrew Bovell’s Things I Know to be True, a co-production with Milwaukee Repertory Theatre and directed by Mark Clements, that the Daily Telegraph (London) awarded five stars and called “A thing of beauty. An Absolute gem.” 

The lineup also includes Native Gardens, Karen Zacarías hilarious new comedy;  Erma Bombeck: At Wit’s End, a tribute to the Ohio wife and long-time Arizona resident, best-selling author, syndicated columnist and a key figure in the ERA movement; the irresistible musical tribute to the power of hope, The Music Man; August Wilson’s Two Trains Running about the social impact of the civil rights movement in 1969 Pittsburgh; and the vibrant new comedy, American Mariachi by José Cruz González about an all-girl mariachi band.

Subscription renewals begin on February 12th for the 6-Play subscription package. Renewals for the 3,4,5 and Flex subscriptions start on March 12th. Renewing subscribers may go online at  www.arizonatheatre.org/subscribe or by calling the box office in Tucson at (520) 622-2823 or in Phoenix at (602) 256-6995. For the 2018/2019 season,

ATC has standardized curtain times in both cities. Performance times will be: Tuesdays through Saturday evenings at 7:30 p.m., Sunday evenings at 7:00 p.m. and all matinees will be held at 2:00 p.m.  New season-ticket packages will be available to the general public starting April 1.

The complete 2018/2019 season schedule:

Native Gardens, Karen Zacarías’ hilarious new comedy, is anything but neighborly (at the Temple of Music & Art in Tucson from Sept. 8-29 and at the Herberger Theater Center in Phoenix from Oct. 4-21).  It’s the story of high-powered lawyer Pablo and his wife, Tania, a doctoral student, who are working toward the American Dream. They move into a well-to-do, mostly white neighborhood in our nation’s capital. A delicate disagreement over a long-standing fence line soon spirals into an all-out, laugh out loud comic border dispute, exploring what is an otherwise hot button issue through a refreshing comedic lens.  “A true breath of comic fresh air.” – DC Theatre Scene.

             Erma Bombeck: At Wit’s End, by Margaret Engel and Allison Engel, directed by Casey Stangl (Tucson: Oct. 20-Nov. 10; Phoenix: Nov. 15-Dec. 2). A loving tribute to the Ohio wife and mother turned long time Arizona resident who made herself into a national superstar as a best-selling author and syndicated journalist who was lauded for opening up the secret world of the mother and housewife. Discover the story behind America’s beloved humorist who championed women’s lives with wit that sprang from the most unexpected place of all – the truth. “Immensely entertaining.” –TheaterMania.

             • The Music Man, Music and Lyrics by Meredith Willson, Book by Meredith Willson and Franklin Lacey, directed by David Ivers (Tucson: Dec. 1-22; Phoenix: Jan. 5-27, 2019). The irresistible musical tribute to the power of make believe marches onto the ATC stages – and into your heart – with trumpets blaring! By turns wicked, funny, warm, romantic, and touching, The Music Man is American musical theatre at its best. “Even if you're seeing it for the umpteenth time, you can be surprised by the musical's vigor, warmth, uplift and virtually faultless construction. Here is both popular art and a model of musical theater craft.” – New York Times

             Two Trains Running, by August Wilson, directed by Lou Bellamy (Tucson: Jan. 19-Feb. 9; Phoenix: Feb. 14-March 3.). From the writer of Fences, the story of a new president in the White House and racial tensions on the rise. But no, it’s not 2018. It’s 1969 - and the Civil Rights Movement is sending tremors through Pittsburgh’s Hill District. Two Trains Running explores a time of extraordinary change - and the ordinary people who get left behind. “Mr. Wilson's most adventurous and honest attempt to reveal the intimate heart of history.” – New York Times

             American Mariachi, by José Cruz González (Tucson: March 9-30; Phoenix: April 4-21). Spending her days caring for her ailing mother, Lucha yearns to break her monotonous routine. Here’s a wild idea: an all-girl mariachi band! But it’s the 1970s, and girls can’t be mariachis...or can they? A heartwarming and hilarious new comedy about music’s power to heal and connect, featuring gorgeous live mariachi music that will send your heart soaring.

             Things I Know to be True, by Andrew Bovell, directed by Mark Clements (Tucson: April 20-May 11; Phoenix: May 16-June 2). Can a parent love their children too much? Is it possible to not love them enough? These are questions that hover over Things I Know to be True, a beautiful and painfully perceptive portrait of a family and the frictions that arise when grown-up children try to push beyond the confines of their loving parents’ expectations.
“FIVE STARS! A thing of beauty. An absolute gem.” – Daily Telegraph

ATC’s 2018/2019 season also will include the launching of the new Arizona Artists Initiative, pop-up collaborations with other Arizona-based institutions and the Summer on Stage program for high school students.

             Summer on Stage (SOS) is a five-week intensive training program in performance and technical theater for Arizona high school students who produce two productions in true rotating repertory under the leadership of Learning and Education Director Israel Jimenez.

Summer on Stage is an important element of our commitment to blend our educational and community engagement programs to the larger season,” Ivers said.

SOS productions planned for the summer of 2018 include Polaroid Stories by Naomi Iizuka, a visceral blend of mythological stories told through the eyes of American street youth, and American Idiot by Billie Joe Armstrong and Michael Mayer, a rock opera based on Green Day’s Grammy-winning concept album that explores the struggles of American teens finding their way in a post-9/11 world.

Both productions will be performed at the Temple of Music & Art in Tucson and are not part of the 2018/19 subscription series.  Tickets will be available at a date to be announced.

The 2018/2019 season sponsor is I. Michael and Beth Kasser.

The Stonewall Foundation is the lead sponsor for the 2018 Summer on Stage program.


The Diary of Anne Frank

Dramatized by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett

Adapted by Wendy Kesselman

Directed by David Ira Goldstein

A co-production with Geva Theatre Center of Rochester, NY.

Finding hope in the darkest corners.  One of the most powerful stories of the 20th century, The Diary of Anne Frank captures the catastrophic realities of eight people hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic in war-torn Amsterdam. Anne’s daily existence – her fears, her hopes, her laughter, her grief and her family’s desperate attempt to preserve humanity in an inhumane world -- drive this transcendently powerful true-life tale. Incorporating newly discovered writings from the diary of Anne Frank as well as survivor accounts to create an impassioned story of the lives of Jews persecuted under Nazi rule, it is a story that continually lingers in our minds throughout the generations because of its optimism and intrinsic truth. The idea that no matter how dire the circumstances, faith in the good of people is what keeps the world in balance – even when all seems lost.  Tucson Sponsor: Shirley Estes.

Tucson: April 21 to May 12

Phoenix: May 17 to June 3

 

            Season ticket packages are now available. Build-your-own subscriptions for 3, 4 or 5 play packages and Flex Passes also are on sale.  Season-packages in Tucson range from $135 to $345 and in Phoenix from $135 to $435.

            For more information, visit www.arizonatheatre.org or call the box office in Tucson at (520) 622-2823 or in Phoenix at (602) 256-6995.


For more information about Arizona Theatre Company, visit www.arizonatheatre.org.

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About Arizona Theatre Company:

Arizona Theatre Company (ATC) is the preeminent fully professional theatre in the state of Arizona committed to inspiring, engaging, and entertaining - one moment, one production, and one audience at a time. Boasting the largest seasonal subscriber base in the performing arts in Arizona, ATC is the only resident company in the U.S. that is fully based in two cities providing its wide array of programming and community outreach across the region. Now in its 49th season, more than 130,000 people a year attend our performances at the historic Temple of Music and Art in Tucson, and the elegant Herberger Theater Center in downtown Phoenix. Each season of home-grown productions reflects the rich variety of world drama—from classics to contemporary plays, from musicals to new works—along with a wide array of community outreach programs, educational opportunities, access initiatives and new play programs. Designated The State Theatre of Arizona, ATC is led by Artistic Director David Ira Goldstein, and a dedicated Board of Trustees.  


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                                                  Tucson Museum of Art

TMA Announces Exhibitions for October Reopening

TUCSON, ARIZONA (August 10, 2017) – The intersection between clothing and art will highlight the reopening of the new and renovated galleries at the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block this October with two new feature exhibitions and a comprehensive reinstall of more than 400 objects from the museum’s extensive permanent collection.


The 2017-2018 season opens October 21 with Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor in the new James J. and Louise R. Glasser Galleries, and Desert Dweller, the museum’s fashion-focused exhibition, in TMA’s Green Gallery. The museum’s galleries have been closed since July 10 for renovation and expansion.

“We couldn’t be more excited about our reopening and what this means for our community and for the Tucson Museum of Art,” said TMA CEO Jeremy Mikolajczak. “These exhibitions include works by major contemporary artists of critical acclaim who use clothing as a signifier in their work, and at the same time we explore the historical significance of the leading fashion retailers and designers of Southern Arizona.”

Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor, curated by Dr. Julie Sasse, TMA’s Chief Curator and Curator of Modern, Contemporary and Latin American Art, examines clothing in art as symbols of power and identity. At once functional and aesthetic, garments are worn to protect the body from the elements, enhance the beauty of the wearer, establish rank in society, and signal to others our differences or similarities. Garments also point to interpersonal issues and conditions as well as larger societal and cultural concerns. Works in this exhibition reveal how artists use concepts and images of clothing to relay compelling messages about gender, age, ethnicity, history, profession and the world around us in general.

There will be more than 50 artists represented in the exhibition, including Christian Boltanski, Joseph Beuys, Nick Cave, Jim Dine, Robert Longo, Robert Mapplethorpe, Richard Mosse, Catherine Opie, Ebony G. Patterson and Andy Warhol. Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor is accompanied by a 64-page catalog, produced for the exhibition and published by the museum. The exhibition will remain on view from October 21 through February 18.

Desert Dweller, guest-curated by Paula Taylor and organized by the Tucson Museum of Art, examines historical and contemporary Southern Arizona retailers and designers as the curators and innovators of style. The exhibition explores the intersection between a fierce regional identity and modern fashion trends from the 1940s to today. It encapsulates the independent spirit and fashion nuances that accompany a strong sense of place, integrating elements of street style, high fashion, and cowboy, Native American, and Mexican cultures into global fashion trends.

The exhibition, which will remain on view from October 21 through January 28, and is accompanied by a limited-edition exhibition guide, free with paid admission. Desert Dweller includes garments and ephemera from Cele Peterson, Berta Wright, Dolores Gonzales, Rochelle K, Lloyd Kiva, Alex F. Jacome, Dark Star Leather, the Patania family, Ted DeGrazia, and Desert Vintage. There will be photographs in the exhibition by New York-based celebrity and portrait photographer Henny Garfunkel, as well as Puspa Lohmeyer, Steven Meckler, and many others.

In addition to the new feature exhibitions, the Tucson Museum of Art will unveil its newly redesigned collection galleries, highlighting significant holdings in the museum’s permanent collection. With 15 dedicated galleries, the new installation will feature a fresh interpretation and format of the museum’s collection areas – Contemporary, Modern, Native American, Western, Asian and Latin American Folk art – as well as an enhanced commitment to regional artists and art of the Southwest.

Among the works on view are exquisitely crafted folk art and pre-Columbian art from Latin America, a rare ceramic vase from the Yuan Dynasty, master paintings and prints from Europe, regional art of the American West, a growing contemporary collection, and Native American pottery and textiles. Highlights include works by Oscar E. Berninghaus, Fernando Botero, John Chamberlain, Gregory Crewdson, Arthur Dove, Jane Hammond, Marsden Hartley, Maria Martinez, Ed Ruscha, Joyce J. Scott, Miriam Shapiro, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Emmi Whitehorse; with recent acquisitions going on view for the first time at TMA by Adolphe William Bouguereau, James Drake, and Tomás Saraceno.

The museum’s renovation and expansion is one of the main objectives of the first phase of TMA/100: A Vision for the 21st Century, the museum’s capital campaign launched last fall. The museum collects in the areas of Modern and Contemporary art, Latin American, Western, Native American and Asian art, and Folk Art of the Americas. Its permanent collection now exceeds 9,000 objects housed on the TMA campus. Additional space for the collection is part of the renovation.

“We believe TMA/100: A vision for the 21st century campaign reflects our vision for TMA to serve as a leading 21st-century regional museum and our commitment to those who share our passion for art, culture, and history of the Southwest,” Mikolajczak said. “The campaign is a responsible and sustainable investment in the museum that increases access to exhibitions and educational programs and promotes the core of the museum’s vision of Discover. Experience. Connect.”

Major support for the 2017 – 2018 exhibition season is provided by the Connie Hillman Family Foundation, I. Michael and Beth Kasser, Anne Y. Snodgrass, BMO Private Bank, AC Hotel Tucson. Generous support for the reinstallation of the collection galleries is provided by the James J. and Louise R. Glasser, Frank and Jean Hamilton, Mary Jo Brown, Jon and Linda Ender, Paul and Alice Baker, Joyce Broan, Burt Lazar, Latin American Art Patrons, Contemporary Art Society, and Linda Caplan.  

Tucson Museum of Art presents Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor

Curated by Dr. Julie Sasse, TMA’s Chief Curator and Curator of Modern, Contemporary, and Latin American Art, Dress Matters examines clothing as symbols of power and identity, and reveals how artists use concepts and images of clothing to relay messages about gender, age, ethnicity, history, and the world in general.

“Conceived out of necessity and spurred by the imagination, garments continually change with the conventions of the time,” Sasse said. “What I find exciting is the variety of ways that contemporary artists acknowledge the symbolic power of dress to express themselves and comment on society.”

Over time, clothing has evolved from purely functional to a powerful signifier of who we are as individuals and groups. As clothing became a symbolic marker of power, influence, and identity, it has sparked debates about the virtues of simplicity, unadorned beauty, usefulness, and conformity versus vanity and avarice. Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor explores such tensions, and highlights a variety of diverse artists who examine how clothing delivers compelling messages about who we are as human beings.

At its core, clothing communicates many things about ourselves: where we are from, what we do for a living, our economic status, the community and people with whom we associate, and how we perceive ourselves, among others. It repels us, attracts us, inspires confidence in ourselves, and elicits a sense of belonging. Garments are subject to widespread change, yet they are also among the most revered objects of our lives, governed by deeply entrenched traditions. What we wear during different decades of our lives serves to mark time. Clothing tells stories. It is our constant companion, there to shield us, to herald us, and to define us. With all its real and symbolic power, clearly, dress matters.

More than 50 artists are represented in the exhibition, including Sama Alshaibi, Laura Schiff Bean, Joseph Beuys, Willie Birch, Christian Boltanski, Robert Bracketti, Bob Carey, Nick Cave, John Coffer, Maureen Connor, John Singleton Copley, Béatrice Coron, Kate Daudy, Claudio Dicochea, Jim Dine, Simon Donovan, Bailey Doogan, Jay Dusard, Johann George Edlinger, Angela Ellsworth, Fausto Fernandez, Julia Fullerton-Batten, Adam Fuss, Guna Culture, Panama, Valerie Hammond, George E. Huffman, Illman Brothers, Graciela Iturbide, Susan Jamison, Benjamin M. Johnson, Walt Kuhn, Karen LaMonte, Robert Longo, Annie Lopez, Robert Mapplethorpe, Robyn Stoutenburg McDaniels, Richard Mosse, Mark Newport, Catherine Opie, Ruth Orkin, Ebony G. Patterson, Barbara Penn, Wendy Red Star, Miriam Schapiro, Raghubir Singh, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Raphael Soyer, Agata Stoinska, and Andy Warhol.          

The exhibition remains on view through February 18, 2018, and will include educational events and workshops with artists including Palestinian/Iraqi artist, Sama Alshaibi, and French-born, New York City-based paper artist, Béatrice Coron.

The exhibition is accompanied by a full-color catalogue, produced for the exhibition and published by the museum, featuring an essay by Sasse and foreword by Jeremy Mikolajczak, CEO of the Tucson Museum of Art.

Lead support for Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor is provided by the Tucson Museum of Art Contemporary Art Society and Kautz Family Foundation. Additional support provided by Betsy and Frank Babb.

Exhibitions at the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block are supported in part by the Connie Hillman Family Foundation, James J. and Louise R. Glasser, Anne Y. Snodgrass, BMO Private Bank, and the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Southern Arizona Fashion to be Featured
in Desert Dweller Exhibition at the TMA

 

The exhibition, Desert Dwellers, to open at the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block in October, will present the “Tucson style” through the work of Southern Arizona’s most well-known and innovative retailers, designers, family businesses, artisans and craftsmen. The exhibition, guest-curated by Paula Taylor and organized by the Tucson Museum of Art, opens when the museum’s renovated and expanded galleries reopen on October 21.

“This exhibition is a glimpse into the fascinating history of the region’s fashion industry and the people who made Tucson a special place to live,” said TMA CEO Jeremy Mikolajczak. “It includes the work of some of the most famous and historic local retailers, fashion designers and artisans, and at the same time presents an interesting portrayal of how contemporary influencers have a profound effect in Southwestern style.

The exhibition, which will remain on view from October 21 through January 21, 2018, explores the distinct local style that was developed and defined by iconic retailers and artists like Cele Peterson, Dolores Gonzales and Ted DeGrazia, and family businesses such as Levy’s, Jacome’s and Steinfeld’s, that nurtured a culture of shopping and a deep attachment to the growing city and the region.

The local style encapsulates the independent spirit and fashion nuances that accompany a strong sense of place, integrating elements of street style, high fashion, cowboy, and Native American and Mexican cultures into global fashion trends.

Artisans and craftsmen added to the fashion and art scene with retailers including Dark Star Leather, producing bags, wallets, and leather belts, and three generations of silversmiths and jewelers from the Patania family, which continues to create refined artisan pieces supporting and reinventing the local fashion identity.

Taylor, as guest curator, has an extended history in the fashion industry as a retailer, fashion executive and educator, and through elite event production in the Southwest and around the globe. She trained with Neiman Marcus designer Pejji Goldin, and partnered with her to launch her first line of clothing. Taylor is the co-owner and producer of Tucson Fashion Week, an annual fashion event that brings celebrities, fashion designers and artists from all over the world to Tucson.

The exhibition will include educational events and a fashion show to close the exhibition, and will be accompanied by a limited-edition exhibition catalog available for purchase in the museum store. Desert Dweller includes garments and ephemera from Cele Peterson, Berta Wright, Dolores Gonzales, Rochelle K, Lloyd Kiva New, Alex F. Jacome, Dark Star Leather, the Patania family, Ted DeGrazia and Desert Vintage. There will be photographs in the exhibition by New York-based celebrity and portrait photographer Henny Garfunkel, as well as Puspa Lohmeyer, Steven Meckler and many others.

Among the educational events will be a retail panel on December 7 at 6:00 p.m., which will explore the idea of place and how it has directly affected changes in marketing, curating and designing throughout the decades. Join TMA’s CEO Jeremy Mikolajczak and Paula Taylor in conversation with Tucson retailers including Rochelle K, Desert Vintage, Dark Star Leather, Katya Peterson, Charlette Padilla and Jeffery Brown. The event is free and open to public in support of the museum’s Free First Thursday program.

In support of Desert Dweller, TMA and Paula Taylor, in collaboration with Film Fest Tucson, will co-present the Arizona premiere screening of House of Z, on Saturday, October 21 at 9 p.m. at the Scottish Rite Cathedral in Tucson. House of Z chronicles the meteoric rise of fashion designer Zac Posen at the age of 21, his brand falling out of favor several years later, and his challenges to rebuild his company and his reputation. It is both a portrait of an artist, and a look behind the glamorous curtain of one of the most distinguished designers and brands in the world, revealing the tenuous dance between art and commerce that informs every move. Tickets are $10 and available via FilmFestTucson.com

Beginning October 21, 2017

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday: 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Free First Thursday @ TMA: 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. Free admission for all, make, drink, and explore.

Second SundAZe: Family Day @ TMA, Sponsored by The Stonewall Foundation: 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Free admission for Arizona and Sonora, Mexico residents every second Sunday of the month. Art-making activities and music. Fun for all ages.

Closed Mondays.

 

Admission
July 10, 2017 through October15, 2017:

Free admission to historic properties. Galleries closed for renovations.

 

Beginning October 24, 2017:

Adults, $12; Senior (65+), $10; Student (with college ID), $7; Youth (13-17), $7; Child (12 and under), free; Veteran and active military with ID, free; Museum Member, Free.

 

About the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block
The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block’s mission is Connecting Art to Life. The Museum was founded in 1924 in the El Presidio Historic District of downtown Tucson. It is Southern Arizona’s premier presenter of fine art and art education programs.


The museum features permanent and traveling exhibitions of Modern and Contemporary, Native American, American West, Latin American, and Asian art. The 74,000-square-foot museum offers guided tours, education programs, and studio art classes in a contemporary building. The museum’s Historic Block of 19th and 20th C. adobe and Mission Revival-style buildings, encompassing an entire four-acre city block, includes the John K. Goodman Pavilion of Western Art, displaying the museum’s notable art of the American West collection, the highly acclaimed museum restaurant Café a la C’Art, and additional exhibition and studio spaces. For more information, please visit www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org or call (520) 624-2333.  Follow the latest events on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. TMA is a private 501(c)(3) charitable arts and education organization.

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Museum Directions
The Museum is located at 140 N. Main Avenue in historic downtown Tucson at the crossroads of W. Alameda and N. Main Avenue. Parking is free in the Museum’s lot on W. Washington Street.

Museum Hours
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 10 AM – 5 PM
Open Late Thursday: 10 AM – 8 PM (first Thursday of each month is free from 5 PM8 PM)
Sunday: 12 PM – 5 PM (first Sunday of each month is half-price admission)
Closed Monday

Admission
Adult/$12; Senior (65+)/$10; Student (with college ID)/$7; Youth (13-17)/$7; Child (12 and under)/Free; Veteran with ID/Free; Museum Member/Free.

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Ranger Tours of Tumacácori Mission Church and Grounds
Daily, 11:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m. January - March

Tumacácori National Historical Park, 1891 E. Frontage Road
Tumacacori, AZ 85640 United States + Google Map
Tours may also be available at other times of the day and year. Call ahead or inquire at the visitor center. Tours leave from the visitor center garden and last approximately 45 minutes.


Museum Tour: Spanish Tubac - A Curator's Look at the Presidio that Transformed the Santa Cruz Valley

An event every month that begins at 11:00am on day 1 of the month
Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel Street

Join us for a guided tour where you'll explore Spanish Tubac and take a closer look at several museum artifacts and discuss their impact on history. Allow 1 hour for the tour. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 12; reservations requested, 520-398-2252


                                                      Blue Willow - Tucson            Cafe Roka - Bisbee



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Family Friendly Programs

          The Tucson Symphony Orchestra encourages families to bring their children to TSO performances as parents deem appropriate. And to make that easy, child subscriptions to Classic, MasterWorks, and SuperPops! series are 50% off the regular subscription price. Plus, children receive a 50% discount to The Magic of Christmas, Messiah, and the Celebrate the Future concert featuring young artists and composers.

 

          The popular Just for Kids Series at the Tucson Symphony Center will begin on Saturday, October 3, 2015 with two performances by the Wind Quintet and continue with two performances on the first Saturdays of November (Piano Trio), December (Percussion Ensemble), January, 2016 (String Quartet), February (Flute Viola Harp Trio) and March (Brass Quintet). The Series concludes with The Really Big Just for Kids Grand Finale concert on May 1. A fun, family experience filled with discovery, storytelling and a front row experience, these interactive ensemble concerts entertain, engage and educate young listeners. A $3 admission is suggested.

 

Moveable Musical Feasts

          The TSO’s Moveable Musical Feasts are renowned for gourmet dinners paired with the perfect wines, favorite music performed by TSO musicians, iconic Southern Arizona settings and as evenings for making and sharing memories.  The two extraordinary evenings this season will be at Downtown Kitchen + Cocktails and Dragonfly Gallery with the TSO String Quartet and Wind Quintet on November 1, 2015 and at Tanque Verde Ranch with the TSO Brass Quintet and Flute Viola Harp Trio on Sunday, April 10, 2016. The evenings include presentations from the chefs  on the cuisine and how wine is paired with food. Feasts are priced at $140 per person, all inclusive.

Pricing

          Subscriptions to the Classic Series are priced from $184 to $504 (eight performances); Classic Winter subscriptions are $92 to $285 (four performances). Subscriptions to the TSO SuperPops! are $92 to $240 for four shows and $81 to $201 for the Winter Series.

 

          Subscriptions to the MasterWorks Series are $175 to $225. MasterWorks Winter subscriptions are $126 to $153. There is a special introductory offer for the Saturday matinee performances during the Winter Series. If patrons order before April 12, the subscription prices for the Saturday matinee performances only are $114 to $141.

 

          Prices for the TSO Classic Special with André Watts are $45 to $95. Tickets for the MasterWorks Special, Handel’s Messiah, are $45, $50 and $55. The SuperPops! Specials are priced at $24 to $77 for The Magic of Christmas and $45 to $90 for The Chieftains.

 

          Create Your Own Subscriptions with your choice of four concerts are available for $103 to $240.

 

          Children grades 1-12, full-time students with a valid student identification card and active military personnel with identification receive a 50% discount on individual, advance-sale, single-ticket prices, even subscriptions (excludes Concert Specials).  One discount is permitted per valid student or military ID. Discounts are also available for groups of ten or more.

 

          Purchase subscriptions and tickets at the Tucson Symphony Orchestra Box Office at 2175 N. Sixth Avenue (just south of Grant), online at tucsonsymphony.org or by phone at (520) 882-8585. TSO Box Office hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. unless otherwise indicated. Single tickets for the 2015-16 season will go on sale August 24.

 

          Prices, artists and programs are subject to change.

 

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                                                                                                           Arizona Renaissance Festival        

THE 30th Annual Arizona Renaissance Festival


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                              Arizona Zipline Adventures, Oracle, AZ

 
Arizona Zipline Adventures has been brought to life through the efforts of many hands and hearts. We are incredibly thankful to have the opportunity to make this a place for everyone to enjoy. What started out as a working cattle ranch is now the site of Southern Arizona's first and longest Zipline EcoTour as well as a central hub for the backside of Mt. Lemmon.

As Joe Goff (one of our major supporters) taught us, there is something to be said for living a life that you love and believing in what you do. He was a hard working man whose connections to this place and to the people who knew him still hold strong.

Making it easier for people to explore and enjoy this area that he loved is something that we feel passionate about and are excited to do. We at Arizona Zipline Adventures believe that in doing so, we are strengthening our community and continuing his legacy.



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            National Parks Logl

National parks continue to be popular among Americans

By Brent Frazee  

 

There are many more miles to travel, many more national parks to visit, before Phil and Judy Goneau's bucket list is complete.

But for now, they can take pride in the fact that they have seen back roads in America as few others have witnessed.

Traveling with their good friends Phil and Candy Reed, they have made one long marathon across the county on their touring motorcycles. They set out with a single goal: to visit each of the lower 48 states. That mission has been met.

But along the way, a second goal developed: to visit as many national parks as possible. A large map hanging in Phil's den in the couple's home in Kansas City North indicates that their travels have brought them through 29 of the U.S.' 59 national parks.

And that total would be even higher if it weren't from some unusual circumstances.

"We got to entrance of Redwood National Park (in California), but a lady at the booth said there were way too many bears in the park for motorcyclists to be safe," said Phil, 71. "She said she wouldn't recommend it. We followed her advice."

But that's one of the few detours the Goneaus have run into as they have toured America's brightest jewels, its national parks. They and the Reeds could be poster couples for the virtues of the parks that preserve some of the country's most beautiful spots.

They have cycled to mountain peaks where they marveled at the snow-capped mountains in Glacier National Park. They hiked to beautiful waterfalls and along creeks in national parks such as Yellowstone. And they have taken in the rugged beauty of the landscape at parks such as the Badlands and the Grand Canyon.

"In the first 18 years of my life, all I saw was four states," said Judy Goneau, 69. "But since then, I've made up for it. I've been to 50 states and I've seen some of America's most beautiful places. I feel very fortunate.

"These national parks are special places that Phil and I hold dear to our hearts."

The Goneaus aren't alone in their love of America's national treasures.

The National Park System, which includes historic sites, monuments, battlefields, recreational areas and wild and scenic rivers, attracted more than 292 million recreation visits in 2014. That was a record, a sign that even in these fast-paced days, Americans still treasure nature and the solitude it brings.

Camping, hiking, fishing, wildlife watching, mountain biking, motorcycle and automobile touring all can be found at the national parks.

"We save what we value," said Jonathan Jarvis, director of the National Park Service. "These national parks are expressions of who we are.

"They are a mosaic of our core beliefs. It's pretty hard not to feel a rush of pride when you stand on a cliff overlooking a place like the Grand Canyon.

"This is America."

The National Park System includes 408 areas covering more than 84 million acres. Every state is represented. In Missouri, the highlight is the Ozark National Scenic Riverways.

Some of the national parks are wildly popular. Consider Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee and North Carolina, which led the nation in attendance last year after attracting more than 10 million visitors.

On a recent weekday, the park provided a vivid contrast between big-city life and nature. Bumper-to-bumper traffic formed on a 10-mile loop around Cade's Cove, an automobile tour that provides beautiful vistas and a chance to view wildlife.

Vehicles filled with tourists inched along as visitors strained to spot some of the park's bears and deer. When wildlife was spotted, dozens of vehicles pulled off the gravel road, and tourists with binoculars tried to get a glimpse of the park's wild residents.

Some worry that some of the national parks are being loved to death. They point to air pollution that has diminished views, dangerous conflicts between camera-carrying tourists and wildlife, and littering.

Jarvis acknowledges the management challenges that crowding brings.

But he added, "I'll take that over apathy any day."

Rick Smith
5264 N. Ft. Yuma Trl.
Tucson. AZ 85750
Tel: 520-529-7336
Cell: 505-259-7161
email: rsmith0921@comcast.net


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The Mini Time Machine Museum of miniatures


EXHIBITS:


HOURS:

TUESDAY-SATURDAY: 9AM TO 4PM 
SUNDAY: 12PM TO 4PM
CLOSED MONDAYS
AND MAJOR HOLIDAYS

ADMISSION:

For more information about visiting, including directions, group pricing and pre-visit activities, please click here or call 520 881 0606

The Mini Time Machine was created from the imagination and dedication of Founders, Patricia and Walter Arnell. Pat’s fondness for miniatures began in the 1930’s, when as a young girl she received her first miniatures- a set of Strombecker wooden dollhouse furniture. It wasn’t until the Arnells moved to Tucson in 1979 that Pat began collecting in earnest. The Arnell’s became very active in the miniature community becoming recognized members and supporters of important organizations such as NAME (National Association of Miniature Enthusiasts) and IGMA (International Guild of Miniature Artisans).The collection grew and the Arnells, dreamed of a way to share it with more people. They envisioned an interactive space where the entertaining and educational aspects of the collection could be enjoyed by everyone- a place that would be enchanting, magical and provide a rich sensory experience.

The concept of “the mini time machine” was born out of the notion that a visitor would be seemingly transported to different eras by the stories and history of the pieces in the collection. The design and building of the museum was a huge collaborative effort. Swaim Associates Architects in Tucson, Arizona was chosen as the architect for the project. The exhibit design was carried out by Claro Creative Studios, a team of designers, gadgeteers and entertainment enthusiasts based out of Glendale, California. Construction of the project spanned nearly two years.

The Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures is a 501(c)(3) board-only nonprofit organization, classified as a private foundation with a long term goal of achieving public charity status. All proceeds from every sale, including admission, membership and merchandise go towards funding the museum’s operations.

The museum is dedicated to all who participate in the world of miniatures through education, creation or enjoyment.


Pima Air Space Museum



 ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. (TripAdvisor ranks it in the Top 10% worldwide for excellent ratings, 95% say “Thumbs up!”) Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft:



 
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                                                                                                                          Tucson Museum of Art

                                                                      About the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block


The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block’s mission is
Connecting Art to Life. The Museum was founded 1924 in the El Presidio Historic District of downtown Tucson. It is Southern Arizona’s premier presenter of fine art and art education programs.

The Museum features permanent and traveling exhibitions of Modern and Contemporary, Native American, American West, Latin American, and Asian art. The 74,000 square foot Museum offers guided tours, education programs, and studio art classes in a contemporary building. The Museum’s Historic Block of 19th and 20th C. adobe and Mission Revival-style buildings, encompassing an entire four-acre city block, includes the John K. Goodman Pavilion of Western Art, displaying the Museum’s notable art of the American West collection, the highly acclaimed Museum restaurant Café a la C’Art, and additional exhibition and studio spaces. For more information, please visit www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org or call (520) 624-2333. Follow the latest events on Facebook. TMA is a private 501(c)(3) charitable arts and education organization.

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Museum Directions
The Museum is located at 140 N. Main Avenue in historic downtown Tucson at the crossroads of W. Alameda and N. Main Avenue. Parking is free in the Museum’s lot on W. Washington Street.

Museum Hours
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 10 AM – 5 PM
Open Late Thursday: 10 AM – 8 PM (first Thursday of each month is free from 5 PM - 8PM)
Sunday: 12 PM – 5 PM (first Sunday of each month is half-price admission)
Closed Monday

Admission
Adult/$12; Senior (65+)/$10; Student (with college ID)/$7; Youth (13-17)/$7; Child (12 and under)/Free; Veteran with ID/Free; Museum Member/Free.


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                           19th Hole Bar and Grille Green Valley Arizona





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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Twist and Shout Diner Green Valley Arizona



Titan Missile Museum  officially unveiled its new nuclear warhead exhibit on Aug. 9 during its cool Saturday summer evening program, Moonlight MADness.

This full-scale model of the W-53 warhead is the “bomb” carried by the Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM). The W-53 rode in the nosecone of the missile and it was the only part of the missile that would make it all the way to its target.

 

The W-53 warhead was a hydrogen bomb. It was the largest nuclear weapon ever deployed on a land-based missile, and after 1975 the W-53 was the largest nuclear weapon in the U.S. stockpile. It had a yield of nine megatons, meaning that it had the explosive power of nine million tons of TNT. 

 

[How much TNT is that?  A freight train required to carry that much TNT would have to be about 1,200 miles (1,900 km) in length. The actual warhead, by contrast, is barely 9 feet (3 m) in length. For additional perspective, a nine megaton weapon would produce a shockwave sufficiently powerful to destroy wood-frame homes and buildings at a distance of about 17 miles. That works out to an area of destruction of about 900 square miles (2,300 sq. km). If the bomb had hit Tucson the entire city would have been completely destroyed per the red circle in the attached diagram. Finally, nine megatons is about 650 times more powerful than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima at the end of World War II.]

 

The exhibit was made possible in part by a grant from the Association of Air Force Missileers. This exhibit is important because the W-53 nuclear warhead was the only significant part of the Titan II weapon system the museum did not have and it answers the extremely common question from visitors, “What did the bomb look like?”

 

“With this grant we constructed an exhibit that includes a full-sized model of the W-53, accompanied by video screens that provide interpretive text and graphics for our visitors,” stated Yvonne Morris, a past commander of this Titan II site and the Executive Director of the Arizona Aerospace Foundation that operates the Titan Missile Museum. Morris continued, “The W-53 Warhead Exhibit makes it possible now for the museum's visitors to understand the full story of the Titan II ICBM and the important role it played in the peaceful conclusion of the Cold War.”

 

Moonlight MADness is the museum’s special summer-evening event that features kid STEM activities presented by “MAD scientists,” special admission prices—just $7.00 for each adult, and kids 12 and under are FREE—and the chance to see THE missile lit up after dark. [MAD is an acronym for Mutually Assured Destruction, the doctrine that the ability of two enemies to annihilate each other prevents it from happening.]

Moonlight MADness takes place the second Saturday of each month from June through September:  Jun. 14, Jul. 12, Aug. 9 and Sep. 13, 2014 from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. Moonlight MADness tours of the underground facility begin at 5:00 p.m., with the final tour starting at 8:00 p.m. Due to space limitations, reservations are required. For reservations or more information call 520 625-7736 or e-mail info@titanmissilemuseum.org. Admission to Moonlight MADness is free for museum members.


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    Gas Light Theatre Tucson
Gas Light Theatrer Tucson





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News from Colorado Parks and Wildlife

HANDOUTS HARM, DON'T HELP, WILDLIFE

 Winter is here and that means animals will have to search a little harder for food. Colorado Parks and Wildlife wants to remind people that the best way to help hungry animals is to let them find their next meal on their own.
 
"People may mean well, but those who feed deer do more harm than good," said Scott Murdoch, a Colorado Parks and Wildlife officer in Conifer.
 
A law passed in 1992 makes it illegal to feed big game animals. This includes deer, elk, pronghorn, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, mountain lions and bears. Feeding wildlife is bad for the animals and dangerous for people, for a number of different reasons.
 
In the wild, deer and elk naturally spread out when grazing or browsing for food. Artificial feeding encourages them to crowd together making it easier to spread disease throughout a herd. Also, artificial concentrations of deer in neighborhoods results in increased vehicle collisions and conflicts with dogs harassing deer.
 
Deer are the primary prey of mountain lions and large gatherings of deer can attract lions into neighborhoods, putting people, livestock and pets at risk. The mountain lions are also then put in danger because it may become necessary to kill them if they become a threat to human health and safety.
 
“Every winter, officer’s deal with numerous pets and livestock that get killed by mountain lions because homeowners are feeding deer; deer do just fine without the public’s help,” says Murdoch.
 
Wild animals have complex digestive systems and their natural diet is difficult to duplicate. Food from human sources can also lead to malnutrition, a disruption in natural migration patterns and death.
 
To report incidents of feeding or other illegal wildlife activity contact a local Colorado Parks and Wildlife officer. If you wish to remain anonymous, contact Operation Game Thief at 877-265-6648. Rewards may be offered is the information leads to a citation.
 
For more information, please visit:
http://cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/LivingwithWildlifeDeeraspx

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HAVE A HEART, DO YOUR PART. BE “BEAR AWARE“ THIS SPRING

DENVER, Colo. - Each year in Colorado dozens of bears must be relocated or euthanized because of conflicts with humans. Often times these conflicts can be avoided by following a few simple steps. Colorado Parks and Wildlife is asking people to do their part to keep bears out of trouble.

Bears have awakened from their winter naps and are searching for food. Bears are always looking for easy meals and are often drawn to towns, residences and campgrounds for a quick treat. Once a bear identifies a location as an easy food source they will return over and over again, which is why it's important to not attract them to the area in the first place.

Colorado, generally, has a two-strike policy for bears. The first time a bear becomes persistent in its search for food near humans, it may be trapped, tagged and taken to a remote area to be released. If the bear gets in trouble again, it is destroyed. Sometimes, however, if a bear shows very aggressive behavior on a first encounter it can be euthanized.

"Destroying a bear is never an easy decision for a wildlife officer," said Abbie Walls, public information officer for CPW in southeast Colorado. "But human health and safety is always our number one priority. That being said, if humans take just a few minutes out of their day to do what is right, we could really cut down on the amount of conflicts we have every year."

Bears are not typically aggressive towards people, but may become so if food is present. Never approach a bear--If you see a bear encourage it to leave the area by yelling, throwing rocks, or spraying water at it from a safe distance. However if food continues to be  present, they will likely return.

Follow these tips to help keep bears out of trouble:
- Keep garbage in a well-secured location and only put out garbage on the morning of pickup.
- Clean garbage cans regularly to keep them odor free.
- If you don't have secure storage, put items that might become smelly into the freezer until trash day.
- Don't leave pet food or stock feed outside.
- Bird feeders should be brought in at this time of year -- birds don't need to be fed during the summer.
- If you have bird feeders clean up beneath them, bring them in at night and hang them high so they're completely inaccessible to bears.
- Secure compost piles. Bears are attracted to the scent of rotting food and they'll eat anything.
- Allow grills to burn for a couple of minutes after cooking to burn off grease and to eliminate odors. Clean the grill after each use.
- Clean up thoroughly after picnics in the yard or on the deck. Don't allow food odors to linger.
- If you have fruit trees, pick fruit before it gets too ripe. Don't allow fruit to rot on the ground.
- Always close garage doors.
- Keep the bottom floor windows of your house closed when you're not at home.
- Do not keep food in your car and lock the doors.
- Talk to your neighbors and kids about being bear aware.

For more tips and information go to, http://cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/LivingwithWildlife.aspx.

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Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages 42 state parks, more than 300 state wildlife areas, all of Colorado’s wildlife, and a variety of outdoor recreation. For more information, go to cpw.state.co.us.

Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ColoradoParksandWildlife

Follow us on Twitter @COParksWildlife


For more news about Colorado Parks and Wildlife go to: http://cpw.state.co.us


For more information about Colorado Parks and Wildlife go to: http://cpw.state.co.us.

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ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Touch 100 years of aviation history at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. (TripAdvisor ranks it in the Top 10% worldwide for excellent ratings.) Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft:

·         the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane);

·         a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs);

·         the world’s smallest bi-plane;

·         the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident);

·         plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca.

Explore five large hangars totaling more than 189,000 indoor square feet—four+ football fields­—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. The 390th Memorial Museum (a independent museum located on the grounds) and two hangars are dedicated to WWII, one hangar each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. It also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PimaAirAndSpace, or by calling 520 574-0462.

 


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BLM’s Project Daylight Seeks to Stymie Smugglers by Removing Vegetation along I-8


 Crews from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT), have begun clearing and trimming brush and trees from along portions of Interstate 8 east of Gila Bend.


The operation, called Project Daylight, is intended to take away cover used by human and drug smugglers to hide and drop contraband along the I-8 right-of-way. The smugglers make their way to the interstate where they transfer cargo to vehicles for further distribution.


Crews will be working over the next two weeks to prune or remove dense vegetation over a six-mile area in three sections from Milepost 126, east of Gila Bend, to Milepost 142. Motorists in the area should be aware of possible shoulder closures and intermittent lane closures.


The area where the work is being done is in the Sonoran Desert National Monument, which encompasses 487,000 acres bisected by I-8. Project Daylight is a tool to discourage illegal activities that damage the natural resources within the Monument.


 The BLM has a fourfold mission in Project Daylight:

“We are pleased to be cooperating with ADOT on this project. We see it as an element of our strategic plan to provide a safe environment for the public, protect the resources of or public lands, and work cooperatively on these issues with other agencies,” said Ray Suazo, BLM Arizona State Director.


An eight-person crew will be pruning and removing trees and brush. A second crew, composed of inmates from the Lewis Prison Complex, will gather the vegetation for dispersal or removal. The follow-up crew will also remove roadside trash and debris left by smugglers. The crew will repair the right-of-way fence, where needed.


BLM staff will be monitoring the cleaned-up areas to determine the effects on criminal activity and trash dumping along I-8. Long-term plans are to prune or remove vegetation along I-8 from Milepost 119, near Gila Bend, east to Milepost 161, which is south of Stanfield. The agencies have not established a schedule for the expanded work.


The BLM and ADOT cooperated in a similar pilot project in 2011, in which vegetation was removed from about 200 feet near I-8 Milepost 150.


Project Daylight is conducted in conjunction with BLM’s Operation ROAM (Reclaim Our Arizona Monuments), an ongoing effort to combat border-related criminal activities and to protect and restore natural resources from damages caused by the criminal activities. One aspect of ROAM is to bring in a contingent of BLM law enforcement rangers for periodic two-week “surges.” During those surges, youth crews and other BLM workers engage in reclaiming illegal roads and trails, cleaning up trash, and other natural resource protection activities.  



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The Tucson Rodeo

La Fiesta de los Vaqueros and the Tucson Rodeo is Southern Arizona’s oldest and most celebrated heritage event, and as one of the top 25 rodeos on the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) calendar, it’s a major stop for the sports’ best cowboys and cowgirls. The Tucson Rodeo features six rodeo performances: February 21st  and through March 1st . Festivities begin at 12:30 p.m. each day. Tickets are $12-$26, and available in advance at www.TucsonRodeo.com, or by calling (800) 964-5662. 

The 2015 La Fiesta de los Vaqueros is Feb. 21 through March 1 at the Tucson Rodeo Grounds, 4823 S. 6th Ave. See directions.

Current and former Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) world champions are featured in each Tucson Rodeo. “The entry list for Tucson could be the ‘Who’s Who’ of pro rodeo,” boasts Gary Williams, general manager of the Tucson Rodeo. “In addition to the caliber of competition and the prize money, cowboys look forward to Tucson because the fans are great and the sky is blue. This is the first major outdoor rodeo of the year, so they’re ready for sunshine, fresh air and 11,000 fans each day cheering them on,” adds Williams.

The Tucson Rodeo Parade is billed as the world’s longest non-motorized parade. This two-hour spectacle features western-themed floats and buggies, historic horse-drawn coaches, festive Mexican folk dancers, marching bands and outfitted riders. An estimated 200,000 spectators view the parade each year.

The Tucson Rodeo enlists over 650 contestants from the United States and Canada competing for more than $460,000 in prize money. The Tucson Rodeo, the first major outdoor event on the PRCA schedule, gives visitors an opportunity to see real-life cowboys and cowgirls display their ability in the only sport in the world developed from work skills.

Rodeo events include bull riding, bareback and saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, team roping and women’s barrel racing. Also featured each day are kids’ events -- Dodge Mutton Bustin’, when four-to six-year-olds test their riding skills on sheep, and the Justin Junior Rodeo for young cowpokes ages 7-12.

The Tucson Rodeo Committee and Tucson Rodeo Parade Committee, both volunteer-based, nonprofit community groups, stage La Fiesta de los Vaqueros.

Proceeds from the Tucson Rodeo benefit a University of Arizona scholarship fund for student rodeo athletes,  the Downtown Lion’s Club, Rotary Clubs and 4-H Groups.

Order rodeo tickets online or call (520) 741-2233.

 

TUCSON RODEO COMMITTEE

La Fiesta de los Vaqueros is staged by the nonprofit Tucson Rodeo Committee, Inc. A portion of the rodeo proceeds benefits community groups including a University of Arizona scholarship fund and local Lion’s, 4-H and Rotary Clubs.

                                                                     


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Annual Tucson Gem and Mineral Show® 2017:

              Tucson Gem and Mineral Society   

Each year the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society strives to produce a great gem and mineral show with something for everyone, and this year is no exception. The theme for our 61st Annual Tucson Gem and Mineral Show® is Minerals of Western Europe.

Europe is the birthplace of mineralogy, so bringing minerals from every country is a fitting tribute. With approximately 250 dealers in our show, in addition to minerals, there will be gems, finished jewelry and many one-of-a kind specialty items for sale.

The Show has something for everyone, from Junior Education for the young to our lecture series for anyone who wants to learn more about minerals, mining, or mineral locations.

Join us February for Minerals of Western Europe. And don’t forget Valentine’s Day. Friday, February 13 – Active Military & Senior Citizens - $2.00 off  (Cannot be used with any other discount)

For additional information, visit: http://www.tgms.org/show-2015/.




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HANDOUTS HARM, DON'T HELP, WILDLIFE


COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Winter is here and that means animals will have to search a little harder for food. Colorado Parks and Wildlife wants to remind people that the best way to help hungry animals is to let them find their next meal on their own.  

"People may mean well, but those who feed deer do more harm than good," said Kevin Madler, a Colorado Parks and Wildlife officer in Walsenburg.  

A law passed in 1992 makes it illegal to feed big game animals. This includes deer, elk, pronghorn, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, mountain lions and bears. Feeding wildlife is bad for the animals and dangerous for people, for a number of different reasons.

In the wild, deer and elk naturally spread out when grazing or browsing for food. Artificial feeding encourages them to crowd together making it easier to spread disease throughout a herd.   

Deer are the primary prey of mountain lions and a large gathering of them can attract lions into neighborhoods, putting people and pets at risk. The mountain lions are also then put in danger because it may become necessary to kill them if they become a threat to human health and safety.

"If you want to do wild animals a favor, don't change their natural behavior. Watch them from a distance and allow them to remain wild," Madler said.  

Wild animals have complex digestive systems and their natural diet is difficult to duplicate. Food from human sources can lead to malnutrition, a disruption in natural migration patterns and death.

To report incidents of feeding or other illegal wildlife activity contact a local Colorado Parks and Wildlife officer. If you wish to remain anonymous, contact Operation Game Thief at 877-265-6648. Rewards may be offered is the information leads to a citation.

For more information, please visit:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/WildlifeSpecies/LivingWithWildlife/Mammals/Pages/HelpDeer.aspx

Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages 42 state parks, more than 300 state wildlife areas, all of Colorado's wildlife, and a variety of outdoor recreation. For more information, go to cpw.state.co.us.



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Thanking America's Armed Forces

  Active Duty U.S. Military and their dependents may now obtain  a free pass, which will allow free entrance to all national parks.

Carlsbad, NM ­To show our appreciation for those who serve in the U.S. Military, on May 19 ­ Armed Forces Day ­ the National Park Service will begin issuing an annnual pass offering free entrance to all 397 national parks for active duty military members and their dependents.
"Our nation owes a debt of gratitude to our service men and women who make great sacrifices and put their lives on the lines to protect our country and preserve our freedom," Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said. "In  recognition of their contributions and service, we are putting out a  welcome mat for these brave men and women and their families at America's most beautiful and storied sites."

While the military pass is not available to veterans and retirees, many of  these individuals are eligible for other discounted passes, such as the Senior Pass, granting lifetime access to U.S. citizens over 62 for $10, and the Access Pass granting free lifetime access for permanently disabled U.S. citizens. For a description of all available passes, visit this website, http://www.nps.gov/findapark/passes.htm

National parks and the military have strong ties going back to the establishment of Yellowstone as the world's first national park in 1872. The U.S. Cavalry watched over America's national parks and did double duty, serving as the first park rangers until the National Park Service was created 44 years later. During World War II, many parks were set aside for the training and care of military personnel. Today, dozens of national parks commemorate military battles and achievements.

www.nps.gov



                                                                                                                                                     Green Valley News                 



Plan ahead to visit national parks in 2018! The fee-free dates are: 
Carlsbad Caverns Visitor Center is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Last entry into the cave via the natural entrance, a steep hike, is 2:00 pm and last entry via elevator is 3:30 p.m. Due to elevator renovations, visitors are encouraged to plan more time for their visit as lines may form for entering and exiting the cave via elevator. Also, surface activities such as birding and hiking are always free, and mild autumn and winter weather make conditions more inviting for exploring outdoors. The Desert Loop Drive is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and not recommended for low clearance vehicles.
For more information about guided tours, hiking trails, and other activities at Carlsbad Caverns call 575-785-2232 or visit www.nps.gov/cave.

National Parks to Offer Free Admission on 9 Days in 2018 

There are nine more reasons to enjoy your National Park! Thje parks will offer free admission on nine days in 2015. The 2017 entrance fee-free days are:

• February :           Presidents Day weekend

• April :     National Park Week’s opening weekend

• August :      National Park Service’s 99th birthday

• September :             National Public Lands Day

• November :             Veterans Day

WASHINGTON – Circle the dates on the calendar and plan your trip – America’s 401 national parks will offer free admission on nine days in 2015, including several holidays! 



“America’s national parks welcome more than 280 million visitors a year. To say thanks for that support and invite every American to visit these treasures that they own, we are declaring nine days of free admission next year,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Whether it’s that once-in-a-lifetime family trip to Yellowstone or taking a daily walk along the National Mall in Washington, D.C., or the moment at Central High School that your child suddenly understands what civil rights are all about, national parks offer places for unforgettable experiences. 

“National parks not only protect and preserve the places we most value; they also add enormous economic value to nearby communities and the entire nation.  Visitor spending represents a $30 billion annual benefit to the national economy and supports more than 250,000 jobs,” said Jarvis. “Fee-free days are a great way to both thank those visitors and introduce parks to first-timers who can find a new place to call an old favorite.”  

With more than 84 million acres of spectacular scenery, 17,000 miles of trails, 5,000 miles of shoreline, 27,000 historic and prehistoric structures, and 100 million museum items and an infinite number of authentic American stories to tell, national parks offer something for every taste. 

Those in search of superlatives will find them in national parks including the country’s highest point (in Denali National Park) and lowest point (in Death Valley National Park), deepest lake (Crater Lake National Park), longest cave (Mammoth Cave National Park), tallest trees (Redwood National Park), and highest waterfall (Yosemite National Park). 

Normally, 133 national parks charge an entrance fee that ranges from $3 to $25. The entrance fee waiver does not cover amenity or user fees for things like camping, boat launches, transportation, or special tours. 

Other Federal land management agencies that will offer fee-free days in 2015 are:  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Forest Service and the Army Corps of Engineers.  Please contact each for details. 

The National Park Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S. Forest Service also participate in the America the Beautiful National Parks Pass and Federal Recreational Lands Pass programs. These passes provide access to more than 2,000 national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, grasslands, and other federal lands. Four passes are available:

·        free annual pass to current military members and their dependents

·        free lifetime pass for people with permanent disabilities

·        $10 lifetime senior pass for those aged 62 and over

·        $80 annual pass for the general public.

 

www.nps.gov

     Kitt Peak National Observatory         Arizona Sonora Desert Museum      Warden Aquarium     Reid Park Zoo logo       Biosphere 2 Tucson AZ


      Kit Peak National Observatory,    noao.edu,   520-318-8726






     
State Department Issues Travel Warnings

BED BUG Resistry

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" Thanks for Being Part of History, and not Just  A Spectator."

            Arizona Star  Arizona Republic       The Tucson Citizen


Political Roundup
                              Political funny


                 Dr Kelli Ward for US Senate   

        ON, 11/8/16 our nation made a critical decision that will impact the direction of our country for generations.

Donald Trump's "America first" agenda is such a threat to the establishment gravy train, they are willing to let the Clinton Crime Family return to the White House. As a successful and independently wealthy business mogul, Donald Trump will "Make America Great Again" by improving our economy, allowing us to become energy independent, ending the failed Obamacare, saving us from the liberal take-over of the Supreme Court, fighting radical Islam, ending the Syrian refugee program amid security concerns, strengthening our military, securing our borders, enabling school choice and elevating America’s role in the world.

Even without the LONG history of Clinton corruption, Hillary's dangerous agenda would be devastating for our country. She will shred the Constitution, enshrine Obamacare, further open our borders, continue to kill our babies, give our great jobs away to foreign countries and continue to sell access to our government’s highest offices to the highest bidder.

For all those reasons and so many more, we must not allow Hillary and her NeverTrump allies to take the White House. Go vote, encourage and help your patriotic friends vote, and let’s make America Safe, Healthy and Strong Again, Let’s Make America Great Again!

After the election, we will deal with Flake and NeverTrump. If you'd like to join us in that fight please share this with other patriots and join our mailing list.

As always, contributions to my campaign for US Senate can be made here.

To victory,

Kelli


Kelli Ward for US Senate
http://www.kelliward.com/



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Taxes for Lobbyists?  By Norbert T. Rempe

It is disheartening to see businessmen (represented by the Carlsbad DOD (Department of Development)), whose livelihood depends on the free exchange of goods and services, advocate the use of force (taxation) to advance their goal (economic development).  Carlsbad and Eddy County, NM taxpayers should not be forced to subsidize non-governmental organizations, whether the DOD or the Sierra Club, even for generally laudable activities.  Nuclear and other economic activities in our region should be based on voluntary consent and market-driven, not imposed by government.  A market not politically distorted by government is the only economic mechanism suitable for a free people.  The DOD, City Councilors, and County Commissioners should abide by and honor that principle.

Carlsbad, NM City Council Resolution 2011-76, adopted November 15, 2011 directs the mayor to appoint a committee that shall develop a request for proposals for lobbyists “to further the interests of Carlsbad and Eddy County relating to the nuclear industry.”  Scant public discussion by city councilors preceded the decision.  But several members of the Carlsbad Department of Development spoke in favor, and the motion passed with two council members abstaining.

One proponent argued that the motion has community support but conceded that a petition in its favor was not circulated among “individuals on the street”; approximately 700 signatures were supposedly obtained from business owners and managers.  Another proponent emphasized that a lobbyist would cost the Carlsbad DOD $270,000 to hire, while local government could avoid paying the 35% tax and therefore obtain the same services for “only” $200,000.  Research by the city’s attorney identified no legal obstacle to the city hiring a lobbyist.

DOD members previously argued in these pages that paid advocates played key roles in WIPP’s success.  If private initiative and individuals paid for them, I have no problem with them being unsung heroes, and I salute their efforts.  But if they were supported by public funds, their names, their successes and failures, and their compensation should be public record.  Let the sun shine on their deeds.

A deeper issue is whether we should be doing what may be legal but is arguably unseemly and unbecoming.  Let’s not pretend that the “lemming” argument (it’s a common practice; do we want to be in the game?) is morally persuasive.  TV commercials for sexual dysfunction remedies apparently are legal: does that make them proper or appropriate for prime-time family viewing?  (Sad to say, I am almost afraid of the answers I may get.)

Lobbying funded by private interests is fundamentally different from lobbying funded by taxes.  The former is covered by the petition clause of the First Amendment and is an exercise of freedom.  The latter is an overreach of government and an exercise of force.  We can choose not to contribute to lobbying by private interests; we have no such choice when lobbyists are paid for by our taxes.



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CONSUMER REPORTS WARNS AGAINST RENTAL CAR GIMMICKS

What consumers can do to avoid gotcha pricing,
aggressive sales pitches and hidden fees

YONKERS, NY—As the weather heats up and fuel prices continuee to rise, the last thing travelers want is to have pay even more when they hit the road this summer. Rental car companies used to try harder to put the consumer in the driver seat with ease, but today's rental car companies are putting the gas on gotcha pricing, pushy pitches and costly extras.

In its June issue, available online at www.ConsumerReports.org and on newsstands May 10, 2011, Consumer Reports outlines some costly and common car-rental hassles and how consumers can fight back.

"It used to be that car-rental companies made it as easy as possible to get you signed up and on the road," said Consumer Reports senior editor Jeff Blyskal. "These days consumers need to slow things down and be more guarded to make sure they don't pay more than necessary."

Common Hassles

Consumers have a choice when it comes to pricey add-on services and liability coverage. Consumer Reports recommends watching out for these gotchas the next time a salesperson puts the pressure on.

1. There is a fee for every extra.Treat a rental car like a hotel mini bar: Don't take any goodies without knowing the price. This includes GPS navigation, satellite radio, and child safety seats. One Consumer Reports reader was charged $9.50 for $2 worth of tolls after he used an EZ-Pass toll payment transponder he found inside his Hertz rental.

Don't take it: Consumers faced with undisclosed surcharges should dispute them with their credit card company. Be sure to ask about these possible hidden fees: late or early return of the car, going through an unmanned, electronic-only toll gate, road service in case the driver runs out of gas or locks keys in the car, and administrative fees related to parking tickets and moving violations.

2. The insurance hard sell. Rental agents might strongly sell renters on a loss damage waiver that limits the renter's liability for damage for $60 to $250 a week.

Don't take it: Consumers may already be covered on their own auto insurance policy if it includes collision and/or comprehensive coverage. Some credit cards also provide protection. Just make sure the personal policy covers rentals and business travel and that it pays the "full value" of a loss, administrative fees, towing and "loss of use." Also check if it's valid abroad and covers a second driver or comprehensive claims (such as fire, theft and vandalism).

3. Scratch-and-dent claims. Always pay by credit card so any inaccurate charges can be disputed. One Consumer Reports reader was billed $304 for "damage" after he dropped off an Avis Rental in Lyon, France, at the locked return lot before business hours.

Don't take it: Fully inspect the car at pick up time, noting any damages in the paperwork and request a signed, dated copy. Do the same at drop off. If it's before or after business hours, take photos to document the car's condition.

4. Return the car with gas. If not, expect to pay as much as $8 per gallon to have the rental agency fill the tank. Other gas overpricing might not be so obvious. For example, Hertz's fuel purchase option—buy a full tank at the prevailing loccal per-gallon price—might seem like a good deal, but the renterr pays for a whole tank even if they only use a fraction of it.

Don't take it. Always fill it up before returning the car.

5. Decline the upgrade pitch.In good economic years, agencies had more cars than they could rent. Now inventories are tighter, so don't expect to be offered a roomier car at no extra cost. Worse, agents might try to convince the renter into taking a costlier car.

Don't take it. If the agent talks down a specific model, ask about other cars in the same group.

Consumer Reports also suggests looking for deals on websites like Travelocity and Expedia and then calling a specific location to negotiate the cheapest rate. Also check off-brand companies like Ace Rent a Car, Pay Less, and Midway. Groups like AAA, AARP, Costco, labor unions and other groups might offer discounts. For more tips on how to get the best deal on car rentals log on to www.ConsumerReports.org.

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MORE ACTIVITIES:

                    Pima Air and Space Tucson AZ


ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM

Touch 100 years of aviation history at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. (TripAdvisor ranks it in the Top 10% worldwide for excellent ratings.) Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft:

·         the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane);

·         a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs);

·         the world’s smallest bi-plane;

·         the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident);

·         plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca.

Explore five large hangars totaling more than 189,000 indoor square feet—four+ football fields­—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. The 390th Memorial Museum (a independent museum located on the grounds) and two hangars are dedicated to WWII, one hangar each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. It also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PimaAirAndSpace, or by calling 520 574-0462.

 

 

Reoccurring Events:

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Carlsbad Taverns®
637 Canal St.
Carlsbad, NM 88220
575-628-3389
"Home of Ray's Loco Ale"

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-midnight.

Carlsbad Taverns Brewery Bar-B-Que is located in the the heart of Carlsbad,NM, Main Street District, just thirty minutes from the World famous Carlsbad Caverns National Park. This restaurant and tasting room is also the home of our microbrewery where we bottle and keg all of our great fresh ales for off premise sales. Come by for some awesome bar-b-que, fresh beer and a tour of our brew house.

Carlsbad Taverns Brewery and Bar-B-Que opened in April of 2001 and was voted one of the best brewpubs in Carlsbad, NM in 2003. The Bar-B-Que offers some of the best bar-b-que in Southeastern NM. Our menu features hickory smoked pork ribs, 16-hour smoked pulled pork, beef brisket, juicy chicken, breast of turkey and heart stopper sausage. The menu offers some great appetizers, soups & salads, sandwiches and full platters, all made fresh daily by our skilled kitchen staff.

-tBs-

TUCSON'S FIVE SEASONS

I've heard many people say, "I'd never live in Tucson... You have no seasons." I've also heard people say, "Tucson has only one season -- Hot," usually followed by a chuckle. Next time you hear this, tell the misinformed person that Tucson actually relishes 5 seasons, one more than everyone else! Besides the images below, check out "Annual Change" to see how one spot changes in appearance through the year.

SPRING: Late February - April. Days are usually warm and sunny with cool nights (however, the occasional cold snap can still come through; it snowed in Tucson on Easter in 1999). This is peak wildflower season, with both "winter" wildflowers and shrubs splashing the desert with color. Toward the end of the season the leguminous trees and the cactuses (even the occasional Saguaro) are blooming. Migratory birds fly through Tucson, using the riparian (wetter) areas as corridors north. Many of the migrating birds stay (e.g., Black-chinned Hummingbirds and White-winged Doves) to breed. Many of our local animals are breeding. Reptiles come out to soak up the warmth and breed. Butterflies and other insects take advantage of the good weather and abundant food.

DRY SUMMER: May - June. Days are usually hot, and dry, but the nights are still cool. This is when the majority of the saguaro (and other columnar cactuses) bloom, and the bats that pollinate them (e.g., Lesser Long-nosed Bat) migrate into the area from Mexico. Later in the season, the cactus fruits Jojoba seeds, and legume tree pods ripen, providing food for people and animals at a critical time of year (hot and dry). This is when the buzz of cicadas fills our ears.

MONSOON SUMMER: June - September. Beginning in 2008, the monsoon period in Tucson offically extends from June 15 - September 30. Before 2008, the monsoon period began officially after 3 consecutive days with daily mean surface dew points of 55 degrees F or greater (representing an influx of moisture into our area). The increase in dew point occurs when the prevailing winds shift from westerly to southeasterly, bringing more moisture in from the Gulf of California (mostly) and Gulf of Mexico. Days often begin clear and very warm, but as the heat of the day builds, huge clouds build and tower above (see Why it Rains), cooling the temperatures somewhat (but increasing relative humidity) and often dumping huge quantities of rain in a very short time. This is the time of wind and dust, flashfloods and lightening. Summer rains trigger the appearance of many animals. For example, many of our amphibians emerge above ground and begin their hasty breeding cycle, taking advantage of the massive flights of new ant and termite queens and males, among other insects. Summer rains also trigger a second wildflower show, this time composed of "summer" wildflowers and shrubs. Wonderfully-sweet Prickly Pear fruit ripen (see in picture to right). Birds begin moving through and out during their fall migration.

Monsoon (Storm) Safety

         Never cross a wash or road that has running water flowing over it.  The water depth is very easy to misjudge, and the road itself may be damaged or destroyed underneath the murky water.  As little as ten inches of water can float average-sized cars, mini-vans, SUVs and trucks.  Be especially cautious at night as flood dangers are much more difficult to see in the dark. 

 

         Do not play in wet or dry washes especially when thunderstorms are in the area. A wash can become flooded in a matter of minutes even if it is not raining in that area. Flash flooding can occur many miles away from the thunderstorm as the runoff flows into the valleys and deserts.

 

         During a monsoon storm stay home or inside the building where you are until the rains and lightning have passed. When indoors, do not touch any wires or plumbing inside a building. Telephone lines and metal pipes can conduct electricity. Unplug appliances not necessary for obtaining weather information. Avoid using corded telephones or any electrical appliance.

When in doubt, wait it out!


FALL: October - November. Days are still hot at the beginning of the season, but nights become cool again as the humidity leaves the area (see the bottom of Meteorological Concepts). Things begin to quiet down. Reptiles begin seeking shelter. Wintering hawks and sparrows begin moving into the Tucson area. Desert Broom blooms, much to the agony of allergy sufferers but much to the pleasure of the many butterflies that visit Desert Broom. Freezing temperatures and even snow can occur late in the season. Octotillo leaves turn orange and drop off (see picture). Toward the end of the season, as temperatures cool off, animals that were more nocturnal during the summer now begin to become more diurnal and visible. This is when many of the wildflower seeds are waiting for cues to germinate. If the rains are right, we can expect a magnificent show; if the rains are not right, many of the seeds will wait for another year.

WINTER: December - Early February. Days are usually clear, except when fronts move through bringing clouds and rain (or rarely snow), but daytime temperatures plummet to the 60s and nighttime temperatures average in the upper 30 and lower 40s. This means we often have to scrape ice off our windshields. This is also the season that we listen to the Northern Mockingbirds sing all night long, as they establish their territories and show off their song repertoires. Gila Woodpeckers and Flickers, lacking the beautiful voice of the mockingbirds, tap loudly on anything that will resonate (such as trees, houses, light poles, and other metal objects) to establish territories. Phainopeplas adorn the treetops between feasting on Desert Mistletoe berries. Many plants drop their leaves (e.g., Velvet Mesquite and other leguminous trees), but the winter rains may trigger leafing in shrubs such as Brittlebush and Ocotillos. Early wildflowers begin to bloom as harbingers to the spring.

Also see Tucson Climate Statistics for precipitation and temperature data by month.



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